Dad is Bauld-o

Two days and counting until the conclusion of my aristocratic life of leisure. I have to admit I was only partially kidding when I asked the doc today if she could write me a note for a few more days at home. She said yes, but against my better judgement, I declined. 0-;

“Please Mommy can I stay home from school?”

I know…pull the hot lamp next to the bed over, apply to forehead, simulate fever…yeah that’s it, that’s the ticket.

The truth is, its time to return to normalcy and that means getting back to work. I know it and think I am ready. Sorry work, the tyrant shall soon return.

The last 3+ weeks have been some of the most intense life experiences I have ever had. The sheer potency, duration and length of extreme pain, emotions, spiritual (if I can be so bold as to say that) and human interactions will not soon be forgotten. Nor should it really.

After the fog cleared and the multitude of side effects subsided, I have been able to read quite a bit again. Not that I wasn’t learning a lot binging The Office.

Most instructive but, not that there is anything wrong with it, there are may be more nutritious entertainment, maybe.

In addition to one of my favorite go-tos “blinklist” (a great way to cheat on good books) and a host of business and science topics, I mainly went on a near death experience book tear – Eben Alexander, Mary C. Neal, Anita Moorjani, Elizageth Kubler-Ross, and a few others I can’t recall. Fascinating stuff if you have not checked the subject out. For whatever reason such accounts seem to resonate with me. Maybe because they are so, contemporary. Hearing someone else’s experience in their own words really lends a degree of credibility (for me anyways).

When you are diagnosed with a life threatening illness, thoughts about death that was supposed to be coming when old and gray(er) leap across time and become an more imminent concern. I realized when it happened what an illusion time really is, and how (however cliche) fast a recognition of my own mortality would come whether that was to be in 2 days or 30 years. Might as well think seriously about such subjects now and try to settle with it.

Perhaps even more compelling than the comfort such near death experiences can bring to ye (me) of little faith, there was also the impact described in many of those books. The effects of the a near death experience almost invariably included dramatic physical recovery from catastrophic illness or injury.

Anita Moorjani, for instance, had slipped into what was believed to be her final coma, with massive tumors consuming her body; only to wake, post near death experience, to see such tumors melt away. The medical community has a term for these unexplained recoveries, “spontaneous remission” and, as discussed, each one of those “NDEs” was accompanied by complete recovery. Fascinating.

For me this only serves to underscore the importance of the mental, emotional and spiritual side of combating a life threatening illness. Here I think Bernie Siegel, MD, has a lot of powerful stuff. If I were to recommend any book, beyond the NDE authors above, I would pimp his, “Love, Medicine & Miracles.” I’m too lazy to provide a book report here, but let me just say I think this is a must read for any cancer patient as well as the doctors treating them. The relationship between the mental, emotional and spiritual game with the physical emphasis (arguably over-emphasis/final word) in western medicine is compellingly laid out.

Anyways, back to more pressing matters. Namely – HAIR.

I was shedding more than the Elsa the dog all over the house – clumps on the couch, shower, bed, shoulders, etc. Its still falling but we decided to preemptively shave the head. The verdict is still out whether the eyebrows are next.

The boys, in all their kindness, immediately commenced the cat calls, post razor.

Let’s see:

“Dad your nose looks really big now – even bigger in fact. And those glasses, man those are like huge.”

“The scars on the back of your head are really ugly.”

“Yeah,” D said to his Grandpa, “He’s pretty much ‘follically’ challenged full time now.”

“Nice skullet Daddy.”

“My Dad is a baldo.”

Gotta love it man.